When is a Bigint a long and when is a long a long

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When is a Bigint a long and when is a long a long

Anwar AliKhan
As you know I have been puzzling over this issue :
How come spark.range(100).reduce(_+_)
worked in earlier spark version but not with the most recent versions.

well,

When you first create a dataset, by default the column "id" datatype is  [BigInt],
It is a bit like a coin Long on one side and bigint on the other side.

scala> val myrange = spark.range(1,100)
myrange: org.apache.spark.sql.Dataset[Long] = [id: bigint]

The Spark framework error message after parsing the reduce(_+_) method confirms this
and moreover stresses its constraints of expecting data  type long as parameter argument(s).

scala> myrange.reduce(_+_)
<console>:26: error: overloaded method value reduce with alternatives:
  (func: org.apache.spark.api.java.function.ReduceFunction[java.lang.Long])java.lang.Long <and>
  (func: (java.lang.Long, java.lang.Long) => java.lang.Long)java.lang.Long
 cannot be applied to ((java.lang.Long, java.lang.Long) => scala.Long)
       myrange.reduce(_+_)
               ^


But if you ask the printSchema method it disagrees with both of the above and says the column "id" data is Long.
scala> range100.printSchema()
root
 |-- id: long (nullable = false)

If I ask the collect() method, the collect() method  agrees with printSchema() that the datatype of column "id" is  Long and not BigInt.

scala> range100.collect()
res10: Array[Long] = Array(0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99)


To settle the dispute between the methods and get the collect() to "show me the money" I  called the collect() to pass its return type to reduce(_+_).

"Here is the money"
scala> range100.collect().reduce(_+_)
res11: Long = 4950

The collect() and printSchema methods could be implying  there is no difference between a Long or  a BingInt.

Questions :  These return type  differentials, are they  by design  or an oversight  bug ?
Questions :  Why the change from earlier version to later version ?
Question   :     Will you be updating the reduce(_+_)  method ?

When it comes to creating a dataset using toDs there is no dispute,
all the methods agree that it is neither a BigInt or a Long but an int even integer.

scala> val dataset = Seq(1, 2, 3).toDS()
dataset: org.apache.spark.sql.Dataset[Int] = [value: int]

scala> dataset.collect()
res29: Array[Int] = Array(1, 2, 3)

scala> dataset.printSchema()
root
 |-- value: integer (nullable = false)

scala> dataset.show()
+-----+
|value|
+-----+
|    1|
|    2|
|    3|
+-----+

scala> dataset.reduce(_+_)
res7: Int = 6


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Re: When is a Bigint a long and when is a long a long

srowen
There are several confusing things going on here. I think this is part
of the explanation, not 100% sure:

'bigint' is the Spark SQL type of an 8-byte long. 'long' is the type
of a JVM primitive. Both are the same, conceptually, but represented
differently internally as they are logically somewhat different ideas.

The first thing I'm not sure about is why the toString of
Dataset[Long] reports a 'bigint' and printSchema() reports 'long'.
That might be a (cosmetic) bug.

Second, in Scala 2.12, its SAM support causes calls to reduce() and
other methods, using an Object type, to be ambiguous, because Spark
has long since had Java-friendly overloads that support a SAM
interface for Java callers. Those weren't removed to avoid breakage,
at the cost of having to explicitly tell it what overload you want.
(They are equivalent)

This is triggered because range() returns java.lang.Longs, not long
primitives (i.e. scala.Long). I assume that is to make it versatile
enough to use in Java too, and because it's hard to write an overload
(would have to rename it)

But that means you trigger the SAM overload issue.

Anything you do that makes this a Dataset[scala.Long] resolves it, as
it is no longer ambiguous (Java-friendly Object-friendly overload does
not apply). For example:

spark.range(10).map(_.toLong).reduce(_+_)

If you collect(), you still have an Array[java.lang.Long]. But Scala
implicits and conversions make .reduce(_+_) work fine on that; there
is no "Java-friendly" overload in the way.

Normally all of this just works and you can ignore these differences.
This is a good example of a corner case in which it's inconvenient,
because of the old Java-friendly overloads. This is by design though.

On Sat, Jun 27, 2020 at 8:29 AM Anwar AliKhan <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> As you know I have been puzzling over this issue :
> How come spark.range(100).reduce(_+_)
> worked in earlier spark version but not with the most recent versions.
>
> well,
>
> When you first create a dataset, by default the column "id" datatype is  [BigInt],
> It is a bit like a coin Long on one side and bigint on the other side.
>
> scala> val myrange = spark.range(1,100)
> myrange: org.apache.spark.sql.Dataset[Long] = [id: bigint]
>
> The Spark framework error message after parsing the reduce(_+_) method confirms this
> and moreover stresses its constraints of expecting data  type long as parameter argument(s).
>
> scala> myrange.reduce(_+_)
> <console>:26: error: overloaded method value reduce with alternatives:
>   (func: org.apache.spark.api.java.function.ReduceFunction[java.lang.Long])java.lang.Long <and>
>   (func: (java.lang.Long, java.lang.Long) => java.lang.Long)java.lang.Long
>  cannot be applied to ((java.lang.Long, java.lang.Long) => scala.Long)
>        myrange.reduce(_+_)
>                ^
>
> But if you ask the printSchema method it disagrees with both of the above and says the column "id" data is Long.
> scala> range100.printSchema()
> root
>  |-- id: long (nullable = false)
>
> If I ask the collect() method, the collect() method  agrees with printSchema() that the datatype of column "id" is  Long and not BigInt.
>
> scala> range100.collect()
> res10: Array[Long] = Array(0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99)
>
> To settle the dispute between the methods and get the collect() to "show me the money" I  called the collect() to pass its return type to reduce(_+_).
>
> "Here is the money"
> scala> range100.collect().reduce(_+_)
> res11: Long = 4950
>
> The collect() and printSchema methods could be implying  there is no difference between a Long or  a BingInt.
>
> Questions :  These return type  differentials, are they  by design  or an oversight  bug ?
> Questions :  Why the change from earlier version to later version ?
> Question   :     Will you be updating the reduce(_+_)  method ?
>
> When it comes to creating a dataset using toDs there is no dispute,
> all the methods agree that it is neither a BigInt or a Long but an int even integer.
>
> scala> val dataset = Seq(1, 2, 3).toDS()
> dataset: org.apache.spark.sql.Dataset[Int] = [value: int]
>
> scala> dataset.collect()
> res29: Array[Int] = Array(1, 2, 3)
>
> scala> dataset.printSchema()
> root
>  |-- value: integer (nullable = false)
>
> scala> dataset.show()
> +-----+
> |value|
> +-----+
> |    1|
> |    2|
> |    3|
> +-----+
>
> scala> dataset.reduce(_+_)
> res7: Int = 6
>

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Re: When is a Bigint a long and when is a long a long

Anwar AliKhan
So the range function actually returns BigInt (Spark SQL type)
and the fact Dataset[Long] and printSchema are displaying (toString())
Long instead of BigInt needs looking into.

Putting that to one side

My issue with using collect() to get around the casting of elements returned
by range is,  I read some literature which says the collect() returns all the data to the driver
and so can likely cause Out Of memory error.

Question:
Is it correct that collect() behaves that way and can cause Out of memory error ?

Obviously it will be better to use  .map for casting because then the work is being done by workers.
spark.range(10).map(_.toLong),reduce(_+_)


On Sat, 27 Jun 2020, 15:42 Sean Owen, <[hidden email]> wrote:
There are several confusing things going on here. I think this is part
of the explanation, not 100% sure:

'bigint' is the Spark SQL type of an 8-byte long. 'long' is the type
of a JVM primitive. Both are the same, conceptually, but represented
differently internally as they are logically somewhat different ideas.

The first thing I'm not sure about is why the toString of
Dataset[Long] reports a 'bigint' and printSchema() reports 'long'.
That might be a (cosmetic) bug.

Second, in Scala 2.12, its SAM support causes calls to reduce() and
other methods, using an Object type, to be ambiguous, because Spark
has long since had Java-friendly overloads that support a SAM
interface for Java callers. Those weren't removed to avoid breakage,
at the cost of having to explicitly tell it what overload you want.
(They are equivalent)

This is triggered because range() returns java.lang.Longs, not long
primitives (i.e. scala.Long). I assume that is to make it versatile
enough to use in Java too, and because it's hard to write an overload
(would have to rename it)

But that means you trigger the SAM overload issue.

Anything you do that makes this a Dataset[scala.Long] resolves it, as
it is no longer ambiguous (Java-friendly Object-friendly overload does
not apply). For example:

spark.range(10).map(_.toLong).reduce(_+_)

If you collect(), you still have an Array[java.lang.Long]. But Scala
implicits and conversions make .reduce(_+_) work fine on that; there
is no "Java-friendly" overload in the way.

Normally all of this just works and you can ignore these differences.
This is a good example of a corner case in which it's inconvenient,
because of the old Java-friendly overloads. This is by design though.

On Sat, Jun 27, 2020 at 8:29 AM Anwar AliKhan <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> As you know I have been puzzling over this issue :
> How come spark.range(100).reduce(_+_)
> worked in earlier spark version but not with the most recent versions.
>
> well,
>
> When you first create a dataset, by default the column "id" datatype is  [BigInt],
> It is a bit like a coin Long on one side and bigint on the other side.
>
> scala> val myrange = spark.range(1,100)
> myrange: org.apache.spark.sql.Dataset[Long] = [id: bigint]
>
> The Spark framework error message after parsing the reduce(_+_) method confirms this
> and moreover stresses its constraints of expecting data  type long as parameter argument(s).
>
> scala> myrange.reduce(_+_)
> <console>:26: error: overloaded method value reduce with alternatives:
>   (func: org.apache.spark.api.java.function.ReduceFunction[java.lang.Long])java.lang.Long <and>
>   (func: (java.lang.Long, java.lang.Long) => java.lang.Long)java.lang.Long
>  cannot be applied to ((java.lang.Long, java.lang.Long) => scala.Long)
>        myrange.reduce(_+_)
>                ^
>
> But if you ask the printSchema method it disagrees with both of the above and says the column "id" data is Long.
> scala> range100.printSchema()
> root
>  |-- id: long (nullable = false)
>
> If I ask the collect() method, the collect() method  agrees with printSchema() that the datatype of column "id" is  Long and not BigInt.
>
> scala> range100.collect()
> res10: Array[Long] = Array(0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99)
>
> To settle the dispute between the methods and get the collect() to "show me the money" I  called the collect() to pass its return type to reduce(_+_).
>
> "Here is the money"
> scala> range100.collect().reduce(_+_)
> res11: Long = 4950
>
> The collect() and printSchema methods could be implying  there is no difference between a Long or  a BingInt.
>
> Questions :  These return type  differentials, are they  by design  or an oversight  bug ?
> Questions :  Why the change from earlier version to later version ?
> Question   :     Will you be updating the reduce(_+_)  method ?
>
> When it comes to creating a dataset using toDs there is no dispute,
> all the methods agree that it is neither a BigInt or a Long but an int even integer.
>
> scala> val dataset = Seq(1, 2, 3).toDS()
> dataset: org.apache.spark.sql.Dataset[Int] = [value: int]
>
> scala> dataset.collect()
> res29: Array[Int] = Array(1, 2, 3)
>
> scala> dataset.printSchema()
> root
>  |-- value: integer (nullable = false)
>
> scala> dataset.show()
> +-----+
> |value|
> +-----+
> |    1|
> |    2|
> |    3|
> +-----+
>
> scala> dataset.reduce(_+_)
> res7: Int = 6
>
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Re: When is a Bigint a long and when is a long a long

srowen
It does not return a DataFrame. It returns Dataset[Long].
You do not need to collect(). See my email. 

On Sat, Jun 27, 2020, 11:33 AM Anwar AliKhan <[hidden email]> wrote:
So the range function actually returns BigInt (Spark SQL type)
and the fact Dataset[Long] and printSchema are displaying (toString())
Long instead of BigInt needs looking into.

Putting that to one side

My issue with using collect() to get around the casting of elements returned
by range is,  I read some literature which says the collect() returns all the data to the driver
and so can likely cause Out Of memory error.

Question:
Is it correct that collect() behaves that way and can cause Out of memory error ?

Obviously it will be better to use  .map for casting because then the work is being done by workers.
spark.range(10).map(_.toLong),reduce(_+_)


On Sat, 27 Jun 2020, 15:42 Sean Owen, <[hidden email]> wrote:
There are several confusing things going on here. I think this is part
of the explanation, not 100% sure:

'bigint' is the Spark SQL type of an 8-byte long. 'long' is the type
of a JVM primitive. Both are the same, conceptually, but represented
differently internally as they are logically somewhat different ideas.

The first thing I'm not sure about is why the toString of
Dataset[Long] reports a 'bigint' and printSchema() reports 'long'.
That might be a (cosmetic) bug.

Second, in Scala 2.12, its SAM support causes calls to reduce() and
other methods, using an Object type, to be ambiguous, because Spark
has long since had Java-friendly overloads that support a SAM
interface for Java callers. Those weren't removed to avoid breakage,
at the cost of having to explicitly tell it what overload you want.
(They are equivalent)

This is triggered because range() returns java.lang.Longs, not long
primitives (i.e. scala.Long). I assume that is to make it versatile
enough to use in Java too, and because it's hard to write an overload
(would have to rename it)

But that means you trigger the SAM overload issue.

Anything you do that makes this a Dataset[scala.Long] resolves it, as
it is no longer ambiguous (Java-friendly Object-friendly overload does
not apply). For example:

spark.range(10).map(_.toLong).reduce(_+_)

If you collect(), you still have an Array[java.lang.Long]. But Scala
implicits and conversions make .reduce(_+_) work fine on that; there
is no "Java-friendly" overload in the way.

Normally all of this just works and you can ignore these differences.
This is a good example of a corner case in which it's inconvenient,
because of the old Java-friendly overloads. This is by design though.

On Sat, Jun 27, 2020 at 8:29 AM Anwar AliKhan <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> As you know I have been puzzling over this issue :
> How come spark.range(100).reduce(_+_)
> worked in earlier spark version but not with the most recent versions.
>
> well,
>
> When you first create a dataset, by default the column "id" datatype is  [BigInt],
> It is a bit like a coin Long on one side and bigint on the other side.
>
> scala> val myrange = spark.range(1,100)
> myrange: org.apache.spark.sql.Dataset[Long] = [id: bigint]
>
> The Spark framework error message after parsing the reduce(_+_) method confirms this
> and moreover stresses its constraints of expecting data  type long as parameter argument(s).
>
> scala> myrange.reduce(_+_)
> <console>:26: error: overloaded method value reduce with alternatives:
>   (func: org.apache.spark.api.java.function.ReduceFunction[java.lang.Long])java.lang.Long <and>
>   (func: (java.lang.Long, java.lang.Long) => java.lang.Long)java.lang.Long
>  cannot be applied to ((java.lang.Long, java.lang.Long) => scala.Long)
>        myrange.reduce(_+_)
>                ^
>
> But if you ask the printSchema method it disagrees with both of the above and says the column "id" data is Long.
> scala> range100.printSchema()
> root
>  |-- id: long (nullable = false)
>
> If I ask the collect() method, the collect() method  agrees with printSchema() that the datatype of column "id" is  Long and not BigInt.
>
> scala> range100.collect()
> res10: Array[Long] = Array(0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99)
>
> To settle the dispute between the methods and get the collect() to "show me the money" I  called the collect() to pass its return type to reduce(_+_).
>
> "Here is the money"
> scala> range100.collect().reduce(_+_)
> res11: Long = 4950
>
> The collect() and printSchema methods could be implying  there is no difference between a Long or  a BingInt.
>
> Questions :  These return type  differentials, are they  by design  or an oversight  bug ?
> Questions :  Why the change from earlier version to later version ?
> Question   :     Will you be updating the reduce(_+_)  method ?
>
> When it comes to creating a dataset using toDs there is no dispute,
> all the methods agree that it is neither a BigInt or a Long but an int even integer.
>
> scala> val dataset = Seq(1, 2, 3).toDS()
> dataset: org.apache.spark.sql.Dataset[Int] = [value: int]
>
> scala> dataset.collect()
> res29: Array[Int] = Array(1, 2, 3)
>
> scala> dataset.printSchema()
> root
>  |-- value: integer (nullable = false)
>
> scala> dataset.show()
> +-----+
> |value|
> +-----+
> |    1|
> |    2|
> |    3|
> +-----+
>
> scala> dataset.reduce(_+_)
> res7: Int = 6
>
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Re: When is a Bigint a long and when is a long a long

Anwar AliKhan
OK Thanks

On Sat, 27 Jun 2020, 17:36 Sean Owen, <[hidden email]> wrote:
It does not return a DataFrame. It returns Dataset[Long].
You do not need to collect(). See my email. 

On Sat, Jun 27, 2020, 11:33 AM Anwar AliKhan <[hidden email]> wrote:
So the range function actually returns BigInt (Spark SQL type)
and the fact Dataset[Long] and printSchema are displaying (toString())
Long instead of BigInt needs looking into.

Putting that to one side

My issue with using collect() to get around the casting of elements returned
by range is,  I read some literature which says the collect() returns all the data to the driver
and so can likely cause Out Of memory error.

Question:
Is it correct that collect() behaves that way and can cause Out of memory error ?

Obviously it will be better to use  .map for casting because then the work is being done by workers.
spark.range(10).map(_.toLong),reduce(_+_)


On Sat, 27 Jun 2020, 15:42 Sean Owen, <[hidden email]> wrote:
There are several confusing things going on here. I think this is part
of the explanation, not 100% sure:

'bigint' is the Spark SQL type of an 8-byte long. 'long' is the type
of a JVM primitive. Both are the same, conceptually, but represented
differently internally as they are logically somewhat different ideas.

The first thing I'm not sure about is why the toString of
Dataset[Long] reports a 'bigint' and printSchema() reports 'long'.
That might be a (cosmetic) bug.

Second, in Scala 2.12, its SAM support causes calls to reduce() and
other methods, using an Object type, to be ambiguous, because Spark
has long since had Java-friendly overloads that support a SAM
interface for Java callers. Those weren't removed to avoid breakage,
at the cost of having to explicitly tell it what overload you want.
(They are equivalent)

This is triggered because range() returns java.lang.Longs, not long
primitives (i.e. scala.Long). I assume that is to make it versatile
enough to use in Java too, and because it's hard to write an overload
(would have to rename it)

But that means you trigger the SAM overload issue.

Anything you do that makes this a Dataset[scala.Long] resolves it, as
it is no longer ambiguous (Java-friendly Object-friendly overload does
not apply). For example:

spark.range(10).map(_.toLong).reduce(_+_)

If you collect(), you still have an Array[java.lang.Long]. But Scala
implicits and conversions make .reduce(_+_) work fine on that; there
is no "Java-friendly" overload in the way.

Normally all of this just works and you can ignore these differences.
This is a good example of a corner case in which it's inconvenient,
because of the old Java-friendly overloads. This is by design though.

On Sat, Jun 27, 2020 at 8:29 AM Anwar AliKhan <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> As you know I have been puzzling over this issue :
> How come spark.range(100).reduce(_+_)
> worked in earlier spark version but not with the most recent versions.
>
> well,
>
> When you first create a dataset, by default the column "id" datatype is  [BigInt],
> It is a bit like a coin Long on one side and bigint on the other side.
>
> scala> val myrange = spark.range(1,100)
> myrange: org.apache.spark.sql.Dataset[Long] = [id: bigint]
>
> The Spark framework error message after parsing the reduce(_+_) method confirms this
> and moreover stresses its constraints of expecting data  type long as parameter argument(s).
>
> scala> myrange.reduce(_+_)
> <console>:26: error: overloaded method value reduce with alternatives:
>   (func: org.apache.spark.api.java.function.ReduceFunction[java.lang.Long])java.lang.Long <and>
>   (func: (java.lang.Long, java.lang.Long) => java.lang.Long)java.lang.Long
>  cannot be applied to ((java.lang.Long, java.lang.Long) => scala.Long)
>        myrange.reduce(_+_)
>                ^
>
> But if you ask the printSchema method it disagrees with both of the above and says the column "id" data is Long.
> scala> range100.printSchema()
> root
>  |-- id: long (nullable = false)
>
> If I ask the collect() method, the collect() method  agrees with printSchema() that the datatype of column "id" is  Long and not BigInt.
>
> scala> range100.collect()
> res10: Array[Long] = Array(0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99)
>
> To settle the dispute between the methods and get the collect() to "show me the money" I  called the collect() to pass its return type to reduce(_+_).
>
> "Here is the money"
> scala> range100.collect().reduce(_+_)
> res11: Long = 4950
>
> The collect() and printSchema methods could be implying  there is no difference between a Long or  a BingInt.
>
> Questions :  These return type  differentials, are they  by design  or an oversight  bug ?
> Questions :  Why the change from earlier version to later version ?
> Question   :     Will you be updating the reduce(_+_)  method ?
>
> When it comes to creating a dataset using toDs there is no dispute,
> all the methods agree that it is neither a BigInt or a Long but an int even integer.
>
> scala> val dataset = Seq(1, 2, 3).toDS()
> dataset: org.apache.spark.sql.Dataset[Int] = [value: int]
>
> scala> dataset.collect()
> res29: Array[Int] = Array(1, 2, 3)
>
> scala> dataset.printSchema()
> root
>  |-- value: integer (nullable = false)
>
> scala> dataset.show()
> +-----+
> |value|
> +-----+
> |    1|
> |    2|
> |    3|
> +-----+
>
> scala> dataset.reduce(_+_)
> res7: Int = 6
>
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Re: When is a Bigint a long and when is a long a long

Anwar AliKhan
In reply to this post by srowen
I wish to draw your attention for your consideration to  this  approach  where the BigInt data type maps to Long without drawing an error.


"This is a issue with Spring data JPA. If in DB the datatype is defined as BigInteger and in JPA query we tries to fetch as Long then it will not give any error , but it set value as BigInteger in Long datatype."


The use of spark.range(10).map(_.toLong).reduce(_+_)

means extra processing while iterating through each element by map method making ready a  new array  for reduce function.  I feel the extra processing  should be avoided.


On Sat, 27 Jun 2020, 17:36 Sean Owen, <[hidden email]> wrote:
It does not return a DataFrame. It returns Dataset[Long].
You do not need to collect(). See my email. 

On Sat, Jun 27, 2020, 11:33 AM Anwar AliKhan <[hidden email]> wrote:
So the range function actually returns BigInt (Spark SQL type)
and the fact Dataset[Long] and printSchema are displaying (toString())
Long instead of BigInt needs looking into.

Putting that to one side

My issue with using collect() to get around the casting of elements returned
by range is,  I read some literature which says the collect() returns all the data to the driver
and so can likely cause Out Of memory error.

Question:
Is it correct that collect() behaves that way and can cause Out of memory error ?

Obviously it will be better to use  .map for casting because then the work is being done by workers.
spark.range(10).map(_.toLong),reduce(_+_)


On Sat, 27 Jun 2020, 15:42 Sean Owen, <[hidden email]> wrote:
There are several confusing things going on here. I think this is part
of the explanation, not 100% sure:

'bigint' is the Spark SQL type of an 8-byte long. 'long' is the type
of a JVM primitive. Both are the same, conceptually, but represented
differently internally as they are logically somewhat different ideas.

The first thing I'm not sure about is why the toString of
Dataset[Long] reports a 'bigint' and printSchema() reports 'long'.
That might be a (cosmetic) bug.

Second, in Scala 2.12, its SAM support causes calls to reduce() and
other methods, using an Object type, to be ambiguous, because Spark
has long since had Java-friendly overloads that support a SAM
interface for Java callers. Those weren't removed to avoid breakage,
at the cost of having to explicitly tell it what overload you want.
(They are equivalent)

This is triggered because range() returns java.lang.Longs, not long
primitives (i.e. scala.Long). I assume that is to make it versatile
enough to use in Java too, and because it's hard to write an overload
(would have to rename it)

But that means you trigger the SAM overload issue.

Anything you do that makes this a Dataset[scala.Long] resolves it, as
it is no longer ambiguous (Java-friendly Object-friendly overload does
not apply). For example:

spark.range(10).map(_.toLong).reduce(_+_)

If you collect(), you still have an Array[java.lang.Long]. But Scala
implicits and conversions make .reduce(_+_) work fine on that; there
is no "Java-friendly" overload in the way.

Normally all of this just works and you can ignore these differences.
This is a good example of a corner case in which it's inconvenient,
because of the old Java-friendly overloads. This is by design though.

On Sat, Jun 27, 2020 at 8:29 AM Anwar AliKhan <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> As you know I have been puzzling over this issue :
> How come spark.range(100).reduce(_+_)
> worked in earlier spark version but not with the most recent versions.
>
> well,
>
> When you first create a dataset, by default the column "id" datatype is  [BigInt],
> It is a bit like a coin Long on one side and bigint on the other side.
>
> scala> val myrange = spark.range(1,100)
> myrange: org.apache.spark.sql.Dataset[Long] = [id: bigint]
>
> The Spark framework error message after parsing the reduce(_+_) method confirms this
> and moreover stresses its constraints of expecting data  type long as parameter argument(s).
>
> scala> myrange.reduce(_+_)
> <console>:26: error: overloaded method value reduce with alternatives:
>   (func: org.apache.spark.api.java.function.ReduceFunction[java.lang.Long])java.lang.Long <and>
>   (func: (java.lang.Long, java.lang.Long) => java.lang.Long)java.lang.Long
>  cannot be applied to ((java.lang.Long, java.lang.Long) => scala.Long)
>        myrange.reduce(_+_)
>                ^
>
> But if you ask the printSchema method it disagrees with both of the above and says the column "id" data is Long.
> scala> range100.printSchema()
> root
>  |-- id: long (nullable = false)
>
> If I ask the collect() method, the collect() method  agrees with printSchema() that the datatype of column "id" is  Long and not BigInt.
>
> scala> range100.collect()
> res10: Array[Long] = Array(0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99)
>
> To settle the dispute between the methods and get the collect() to "show me the money" I  called the collect() to pass its return type to reduce(_+_).
>
> "Here is the money"
> scala> range100.collect().reduce(_+_)
> res11: Long = 4950
>
> The collect() and printSchema methods could be implying  there is no difference between a Long or  a BingInt.
>
> Questions :  These return type  differentials, are they  by design  or an oversight  bug ?
> Questions :  Why the change from earlier version to later version ?
> Question   :     Will you be updating the reduce(_+_)  method ?
>
> When it comes to creating a dataset using toDs there is no dispute,
> all the methods agree that it is neither a BigInt or a Long but an int even integer.
>
> scala> val dataset = Seq(1, 2, 3).toDS()
> dataset: org.apache.spark.sql.Dataset[Int] = [value: int]
>
> scala> dataset.collect()
> res29: Array[Int] = Array(1, 2, 3)
>
> scala> dataset.printSchema()
> root
>  |-- value: integer (nullable = false)
>
> scala> dataset.show()
> +-----+
> |value|
> +-----+
> |    1|
> |    2|
> |    3|
> +-----+
>
> scala> dataset.reduce(_+_)
> res7: Int = 6
>
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Re: When is a Bigint a long and when is a long a long

srowen
'bigint' is a long, not a Java BigInteger.

On Sun, Jun 28, 2020 at 5:52 AM Anwar AliKhan <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> I wish to draw your attention for your consideration to  this  approach  where the BigInt data type maps to Long without drawing an error.
>
> https://stackoverflow.com/questions/31011797/bug-in-spring-data-jpa-spring-data-returns-listbiginteger-instead-of-listlon
>
> "This is a issue with Spring data JPA. If in DB the datatype is defined as BigInteger and in JPA query we tries to fetch as Long then it will not give any error , but it set value as BigInteger in Long datatype."
>
>
> The use of spark.range(10).map(_.toLong).reduce(_+_)
>
> means extra processing while iterating through each element by map method making ready a  new array  for reduce function.  I feel the extra processing  should be avoided.
>

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